Retired NYPD detective sues LGBT Network for alleged smear campaign

Author Posted FIOS 1, Cecilia Dowd , Aug 9, 2017, 7:15 pm, Aug 9, 2017, 7:20 pm

Tom Verni says he has been a target since he had a falling out with the organization. Verni’s attorney Anthony Colleuluori says what it comes down to is fraud.

Retired NYPD detective sues LGBT Network for alleged smear campaign _ Verizon FiOS1 News – Long Island

 

Media commentator and retired NYPD detective, Tom Verni, is suing a local LGBT organization for allegedly creating a Twitter page with his images with tweets that suggest that he sexually molests underage boys.

He is now suing the Woodbury-based LGBT Network, its CEO David Kilmnick, and others for $5 million.

Verni says things first went south at the end of 2014 when Kilmnick and Verni had a disagreement on Facebook over police turning their backs on the mayor at a slain officer’s funeral and Verni was unfriended.

“As a result of that Facebook dust up that we had, that’s when people started coming forward and messaging me saying, ‘hey, do you know what’s going on over there at the LGBT Network?’” Verni said.

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Contact Anthony Colleluori, Criminal Defense Attorney at Raiser & Kenniff, P.C.

 

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Anthony J. Colleluori, a well known New York and Long Island trial and appellate lawyer, has practiced for over 20 years, focusing his practice on Criminal Law; First Amendment & Obscenity; Constitutional Law & Civil Rights; Civil RICO and Federal False Claims Act cases.

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The Confidentiality Clause – The Abuse That Keeps on Giving

Author: Bill Cafaro

The First Amendment guarantees us the right to free speech, but unfortunately, it is generally legal to force employees (or anyone else) to sign this away. Businesses do this by making people sign confidentiality clauses to get hired, to keep their jobs, or to get their settlement after any employment dispute or lawsuit. Confidentiality agreements prevent the Employee from talking about anything the Company doesn’t want discussed, and always include the amount of the settlement. Read More

What’s So Bad About These Agreements? Shouldn’t Business Owners Have a Right to Some Privacy?

Businesses legitimately need non-disclosure agreements to protect their trade secrets and other vital information from their competition. Unfortunately, they can also be used to conceal systemic violations of laws and regulations, patterns of discriminatory conduct, or sexual harassment.  In those situations, offensive and illegal behavior can continue and flourish.  For example, Fox News used these clauses as a curtain to keep a culture of sexual harassment out of public view for over a decade, allowing Roger Ailes to rack up $45 Million in payouts for sexual harassment claims, and Bill O’Reilly another $13M. Because his victims had to sign confidentiality and non-disparagement clauses as part of their settlements, Ailes continued victimizing women in complete privacy. Ailes was probably able to remove many panties off that would otherwise have stayed on if these clauses were illegal. But for the most part, they are perfectly legal under federal law[1], and with a Republican Congress and President Trump in the White House, this will not change anytime soon.

In fact, President Trump loves these clauses so much that everyone who volunteered for his campaign had to sign one prohibiting them from saying anything bad about Trump, his family or his businesses forever, and it also required the volunteers to prevent their employees (if they had them) from doing so. It also prohibited them from campaigning for any other presidential candidate until 2024, even if Trump had had not gotten the nomination.Read More

Is This Problem Limited to the Employment Context?

 

 

 

No. For many years, the Catholic Church settled claims brought against pedophile priests using these same exact clauses, and it still does. The Diocese would transfer the pedophile priest to another distant parish, the family would sign a confidentiality and non-disparagement clause as part of the settlement, and the priest continued to prey upon different children while the risk remained hidden from their parents.

What Happens When You Break a Confidentiality or Non-Disparagement Agreement (“NDA”)?

What Protections Are There Against This Under Existing Law? Read More

Is Anything About These Clauses Good for Employees? Read More

How Did Dennis Rodman Make New Confidentiality Clause Law?

On January 15, 1997, while scrambling for the ball in a game against the Minnesota Timberwolves, Rodman fell into a group of photographers on the sidelines. When he got up, he did the only reasonable thing – he kicked one of them in groin. Read More

Over the last six years, Mr. Cafaro has applied his litigation skills toward representing employees aggressively in overtime and discrimination cases. He has represented hundreds of workers successfully in individual wage and hour cases, including class and collective actions. He also litigates discrimination cases in both the federal and state courts.

Fluency in Spanish helps Mr. Cafaro to communicate with clients in their native language.

Race Discrimination Lawsuit: Rosebud Restaurants Settled, Paying $1.9 Million

Author:Law Offices of Stephen D. Hans & Associates

In a race discrimination lawsuit, the EEOC sued Rosebud Restaurants and parties settled for the amount of $1.9 million.

The EEOC brought a lawsuit against Rosebud, which operates 13 Italian restaurants in Chicago and nearby suburbs.  The restaurants were not hiring African Americans, and restaurant managers and the Rosebud owner Alex Dana used racial slurs when referring to African Americans. Read More

Before taking legal action, the EEOC first attempted to use its conciliation process to resolve the issue. When a settlement could not be reached, it filed a lawsuit for racial discrimination in hiring based on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Outcome of the Race Discrimination Lawsuit

Details of the settlement include:

  • African American applicants who were denied jobs will receive $1.9 million from Rosebud.
  • Rosebud now has hiring goals for qualified African American job applicants, including that 11% of future employees will be black.
  • The settlement decree prohibits Rosebud from engaging in future racial discrimination or retaliation
  • Rosebud must recruit African American applicants
  • Rosebud must train managers and employees against race discrimination and retaliation
  • For four years, Rosebud must periodically submit reports to the EEOC that show compliance with the settlement decree’s terms
  • Rosebud must post notices that inform employees about the decree’s terms

The parties were able to resolve the lawsuit through lengthy negotiations. The negotiations occurred prior to depositions and significant pre-trial motions that could have resulted in considerable litigation costs. Read More

Your Rights When You Submit to a Medical Examination

Queens |NYC| Brooklyn |Bronx Workers’ Compensation Attorneys

Author:Pyrros & Serres

Your Rights during a Workers’ Compensation Medical Examination

Under New York’s workers’ compensation laws, when you have suffered a work-related injury and seek workers’ compensation benefits, your employer has the right to require that you be examined by a licensed physician chosen by the company or the workers’ compensation insurance provider. Theoretically, it’s an “independent” examination, designed to objectively determine whether your injury prevents you from working. In reality, though, they’ll look for any way to reject your claim, so that your employer and the workers’ compensation insurer minimize their financial losses.

Read More:

 

Your Rights during a Workers’ Compensation Medical Exam

Experienced Queens |NYC | Brooklyn | Bronx Workers’ Compensation Attorneys

At Pyrros & Serres LLP, we handle all matters related to workers’ compensation and Social Security disability claims for people in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and across the greater New York City metropolitan area. Because of our reputation for effective advocacy, many of our new clients come to us as referrals from clients and other lawyers.

To learn more about the full scope of our practice, see our practice area overview page.

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Distracted Driving : Apps to Keep Driver’s Safe

Milo Yiannopoulos Sues Simon & Schuster – Bet They Wish They Had a Morals Clause, but What’s a Morals Clause?

by  | Jul 11, 2017 |

According to the lawsuit he filed on Friday, July 7, 2017, Simon & Schuster refused to publish his most recent book, Dangerous, because of allegations that public statements he made condoned pedophilia[1].

 What’s a “Morals Clause”

It’s a provision routinely included in contracts for celebrity endorsers, professional athletes, newscasters, TV actors, and various other people whose effectiveness and/or salability depends upon the public’s perception of them. Going back to 1972, Marilyn Chambers, the fresh faced young mother holding the infant on the Ivory Snow detergent box  starred in Behind the Green Door, which was considered extremely hard core pornography at that time. This was obviously at odds with the pure and wholesome image Proctor & Gamble wanted the public to associate with its product. Typically, morals clauses allow the company to cancel the contract if the individual is charged with or convicted of a serious crime or conduct which is immoral or widely viewed by the public as reprehensible.Can’t Simon & Schuster Refuse to Publish any Book? Read More

 What Will the Main Issues be in Milo’s Case?

From Fatty Arbuckle to The House Un-American Activities Committee to Charlie Sheen to Brian Williams – How did Morals Clauses Come About and How Have They Been Used[3]?

Image result for fatty arbuckle

Morals Clauses started in 1921 when Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, a very famous silent film star at that time, was arrested and charged with the rape and murder of a young starlet who had been found in his hotel room.  Although the evidence against him was slim and he was found not guilty of all charges, the sensational “yellow journalism” of the day convicted him in the court of public opinion. Widespread outrage at “Hollywood Immorality” prompted the entertainment industry to use Morals Clauses in every contract to protect them from having to continue to pay stars who stepped in scandal, as well as to appease their audiences.

Thirty years later, the House Un-American Activities Committee, at the height of the Cold War in the early 1950s, investigated alleged Communist infiltration of the motion picture industry.

Related image

The next big splash in this area was Charlie Sheen’s contract for Two and a Half Men, which had a very weak Morals Clause,requiring commision of a felony offense involving moral turpitude. This put Warner Bros. TV on shaky legal ground for firing him despite his clearly outrageous behavior, and they had to fall back on the argument that his cocaine use impaired his ability to adequately perform. Sheen sued for $100M, and although the settlement was confidential, it was clearly substantial.

Fast forward to 2015, when Brian Williams, who had just signed a $10M contract with NBC, publicly gave several variations of a false account of a March 2003 helicopter ride during the U.S. invasion of Iraq which he was forced to take back and apologize. His credibility with the public plummeted, and NBC, which could clearly have terminated his contract based on an ironclad Morals Clause in his contract, decided on a six month unpaid suspension instead.

The long and short of this is that every contract is different, and the outcome in each situation is, and will continue to be, determined based on the wording the parties agreed upon when they sat down with their lawyers and made their deal.

[1] As everyone who follows Milo Yiannopoulos knows, he is openly gay, vigorously denies that he has ever advocated pedophilia, and claims that his widely publicized remarks which led to his departure from Breitbart News referred favorably to a relationship he had with a man who was 29 when he was 17. 16 was the legal age of consent in the UK, where this took place. Milo also posted a statement on his Facebook page (which is attached to his complaint as Ex. “I”) denying that his public remarks ever condoned pedophilia. Whether Milo’s remarks expressed approval of pedophilia or not is a question which is not addressed here; it is merely assumed that Milo made public statements which were very heavily criticized.

[2] The NFL contract, for example, allows the club to terminate the player, “if, at any time, in the sole judgment of the Club,….[the] player has engaged in personal conduct reasonably judged by the Club to adversely affect or reflect on the Club.” , http://static.nfl.com/static/content/public/image/cba/nfl-cba-2006-2012.pdf ¶ 11, p. 252.

[3] For an excellent history of the law in this area, see, Morals Clauses, Past, Present and Future, Caroline Epstein, NYU Journal of Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law, Vol. 5, No. 1.

[4] Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. v. Lardner, 216 F.2d 844, (9th Cir. 1954); Scott v. RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., 240 F.2d 87, (9th Cir. 1957)

How Can Lawyers Get in Trouble Over Sex?

Author: Bill Cafaro

The most shameful case in recent history was Thomas Lowe, an Egan, MN attorney representing a divorce client, who had an affair with her that lasted seven months. After several arguments with the woman about the affair and his own marriage, Lowe said he was breaking things off. Two days later, he said he was withdrawing as her attorney. That day, the woman, who was vulnerable because of past abuse and mental health treatment, tried to kill herself. While hospitalized, she disclosed the affair.
In giving him an indefinite suspension, the Minnesota Supreme Court found that he had not only had sex with a vulnerable client; he had actually billed her for meetings during which they had sex.¹

sex at the office

Who’s Gotten in Trouble over Sex in New York Recently?

There were two cases in the past year which make for interesting reading. In one, a lawyer offered to represent a prostitute in a small town court upstate in exchange for her services – a good old fashioned barter arrangement. Unfortunately for the lawyer, his client was smarter that he was, and she contacted the police. The prostitute then recorded phone calls with the lawyer, agreeing that they would have sex in exchange for his legal services. As a result, the lawyer plead guilty to loitering for the purposes of prostitution and got community service. The disciplinary committee found that the lawyer had obviously violated the rule against requiring sexual relations as a condition of providing representation², but he was only given a censure, which is essentially a public reprimand. Although we don’t know it for a fact, it’s a safe bet she got the prostitution charge dismissed for turning the lawyer in, because he was certainly a bigger fish than she was.

office romance

In a much more serious case, Tara Lenich, a Deputy Bureau Chief in the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, was indicted in federal court and plead guilty to forging wiretap warrants. Because she had a romantic interest in a detective who she suspected of dating another female prosecutor in the same office, she forged judges’ signatures on fake orders authorizing her to eavesdrop on their cell phones and falsified warrants for their text messages. She told her colleagues in the office that she was working on an investigation so secret that no one else could know about. A staffer in the DA’s office became suspicious when she saw another prosecutor’s personal phone number on the eavesdropping warrant. She faces a maximum of 10 years on the guilty plea. Although her sentence will likely be far less than that, she will definitely lose her law license because anyone convicted of a felony³ is subject to automatic disbarment under New York law.

Is Sex Allowed Between a Lawyer and a Client?

So What’s the Rule: Is Sex Allowed4 Between a Lawyer and a Client?

There is a strict prohibition 5 in New York against having sex with a divorce client, because divorce clients are often emotionally vulnerable, and there is an increased risk that the client will be exploited. However, even this rule has an exception if the sexual relations started before the client-lawyer relationship , so a lawyer could legally represent his/her lover in the divorce that followed in the wake of their adulterous affair. Also, any sexual relationship6 that begins after the representation is over would not be breaking any rule, even in a divorce case.

What About Sex with Clients in Non-Divorce Cases?

While there is technically no rule against it, any lawyer that starts a sexual relationship with a current client is entering into a grey area. As one court said “because a sexual relationship between a lawyer and client creates the risk of impairing the professional judgment of the lawyer, and rendering the client unable to make rational decisions related to his or her case, the relationship may be detrimental to the client’s interests. As such, “sexual relations between lawyers and their clients are dangerous and inadvisable””7 If the lawyer is accused of doing anything else that’s against the rules, having sex with that particular client will add a “sleaze factor” to the disciplinary case that won’t lead to any good places.

 

Are Doctors Allowed to Have Sex with Their Patients?

Although the concern used to be confined to psychiatry, since 1991 the American Medical Association has taken a much tougher position and adopted a blanket rule. “Sexual contact that occurs concurrent with the patient-physician relationship constitutes sexual misconduct.” 8That same opinion goes so far as to say that “Sexual or romantic relationships with former patients are unethical if the physician uses or exploits trust, knowledge, emotions, or influence derived from the previous professional relationship.” In fact, the AMA goes so far as to regulate sexual and romantic relationships between doctors and key third parties who accompany their patients.9 What will happen to a doctor who dates a patient seems to vary quite a bit, though, according to the particular state and the particular circumstances.

 

 

  • [1] In re Disciplinary Action against Lowe, 824 N.W.2d 634, 2013 Minn. LEXIS 3, 2013 WL 167954 (Minn. 2013)
  • [2] Rule 1.8[j][1][i], Matter of Shaw, 138 A.D.3d 133, (4th Dep’t 2016).
  • [3] NY Judiciary Law § 90(a), (e)
  • [4] This Post only talks about New York, and these are only general rules and do not constitute legal advice. Before getting the room, check with your lawyer if sex is allowed in your state and your particular circumstances.
  • [5] Rules of Professional Conduct , 12 NYCRR 1200.0, Rule 1.8[j][1][iii].
  • [6] 12 NYCRR 1200.0, Rule 1.8[j][2].
  • [7] Matter of Raab, 139 A.D.3d 116, 119, (1st Dep’t 2016).
  • [8] AMA Journal of Ethics, Opinion 8.14 – Sexual Misconduct in the Practice of Medicine, Issued December 1989; updated March 1992 based on the report “Sexual Misconduct in the Practice of Medicine,” adopted December 1990.
  • [9 ] AMA Journal of Ethics, Opinion 8.145 – Sexual or Romantic Relations between Physicians and Key Third Parties Issued December 1998 based on the report “Sexual or Romantic Relations between Physicians and Key Third Parties,” adopted June 1998.

Astoria, Queens, New York Workers Compensation Attorneys

Pyrros & Serres, LLP Workers Comp, Social Security, Personal Injury Lawyers

Author: Pyrros & Serres LLP

Astoria, New York Workers Compensation Attorneys

Job-Related Injury | Occupational Illness or Disease | Repetitive Stress or Motion Injuries | Temporary or Permanent Disability | Partial or Total Disability | Workplace Trauma

If you’ve been hurt on the job in New York, you have a right to pursue workers’ compensation benefits to cover lost wages and medical expenses. Don’t expect your employer to make it easy for you, though. The company has a vested interest in minimizing or avoiding payment workers’ compensation benefits and their workers’ compensation insurance providers will often engage in tactics to delay, deny or minimize your claim. The attorneys at Pyrros & Serres LLP can help. Read More

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Workers comp claims

At Pyrros & Serres LLP, we take an individualized approach to every case. We take the time to learn exactly what happened in your case, and what you need to move forward. We’ll gather all relevant medical evidence and obtain evidence from all witnesses. Read More

We provide comprehensive counsel to people who have suffered any type of injury at work, including:

Back and Neck Injury | Shoulder, Arm, Hand and Finger Injury | Hip, Leg, Foot and Toe Injury| Burns | Fractures | Paralysis | Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) | Spinal Cord Injury | Permanent Scarring or Disfigurement | Amputation or Loss of Limb | Hearing or Vision Loss | Accidental Death |Occupational Illness

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Trump’s Pick for Supreme Court Justice – Neil Gorsuch

Author: William Cafaro

How Often Has he Ruled in Favor of the Worker in Employment Cases so Far?

As an appellate federal judge on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, (where he was appointed by George W. Bush) he decided 23 employment cases, ruling against the worker in 21 of them.

Even though his opinions have a sympathetic sounding tone toward the worker’s plight (unlike the biting sarcasm the late Judge Scalia used), he almost always comes around to explaining why the employer should win. The New York Times ran an article indicating that Democrats would attack him as “No Friend of the Little Guy”.

Can You Give us an Example?

The trailer brakes froze on a big rig, and the truck driver was told to stay on the side of the road with the cargo. After 3 hours in subzero weather, when his torso was numb and he couldn’t feel his legs, the dispatcher told him to keep waiting in the truck, even though the heater wasn’t working, or to drive the rig with the frozen tractor brakes, which was obviously dangerous. Fearing for his health, he drove the tractor off and left the trailer, and was fired for abandoning the cargo. He filed with OSHA under a federal law[1] that says a driver who refuses to operate a vehicle because he is afraid of serious injury to himself or the public can’t be fired for that, and the company had to reinstate him with back pay. When the Company appealed, the driver still won at the federal appeals court, but Judge Gorsuch ruled for the company. His reasoning was that the law literally said that it was for the protection of the driver who refused to operate an unsafe vehicle. Because the driver had the choice of driving with frozen brakes or staying with the cargo and freezing, one of the choices he was given was not illegal, so the company should have been allowed to fire him[2].

What Major Employment Issues Will He Decide if He is Confirmed?

Employees have a major problem now with the issue of “Forced Arbitration”, i.e., many employees, when they are hired, now have to sign papers giving up their rights to go to court if they have any reason to sue the boss; they will only be able to go to an arbitrator, which also stops them from bringing any class actions. For many reasons, covered in an upcoming blog on “Forced Arbitration”, this is very unfair. However, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has held[3] that these forced arbitration agreements violate the federal law[4] which prohibit interference with or restraint of employees’ rights to organize and engage in concerted activities. There is disagreement among the federal appeals courts on this issue, so the Supreme Court has already accepted it, but it has been postponed until the October 2017 term after Gorsuch is confirmed, because it will be a 4-4 if the vote is taken now. This would leave the “split” between the circuits unresolved. The conventional wisdom is that Gorsuch, if confirmed, will rule in favor of enforcing the forced arbitration agreements, and he has made it very clear that he would like to limit or abolish the rule requiring judges to give deference to federal agencies like the NLRB.

A Public Union’s Right to Collect Dues From Non-Member Employees

This is another big issue. The Union’s argument is simple: All of the employees are getting the benefit of the collective bargaining the union does, like wage increases. Why should some of the Employees be able to get a free ride? Conservatives do not want all of the employees to pay union dues because, if union dues are voluntary, many people will generally stop paying them, and as a practical matter, this will mean the end of public unions. Conservatives have an obvious interest in destroying unions because they tend to contribute to Democrats. The recent test case[5] would almost certainly have resulted in an anti-union decision, but it was a 4-4 tie, only because Scalia died between the oral argument and the date the decision came down. When this issue comes up again, Gorsuch, if confirmed, will probably vote against the public unions. If this trend continues in the Supreme Court, which is likely, it is this writer’s personal opinion that within a few more years, private unions will no longer be able to collect dues from dissenting members or non-members. After that happens, all unions will probably go the way of the dinosaur. In the public sector, many union members who resent paying union dues will face a cold hard realization when their wages are sharply cut to balance budgets.

[1] Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA), 49 U.S.C. §31105, (a)(1)(B)(ii).

[2] TransAm Trucking, Inc. v. Admin. Review Bd., United States DOL, 833 F.3d 1206, 1215, 2016 U.S. App. LEXIS 18838, *22, 41 I.E.R. Cas. (BNA) 1295 (10th Cir. 2016).

[3] Buy Low Markets, Inc. and Palacios, NRLB, San Francisco Office, Case 21–CA–173346.

[4] National Labor Relations Act, 29 U.S.C. § 158(a).

[5] Friedrichs v. Cal. Teachers Ass’n, 194 L. Ed. 2d 255, 2016 U.S. LEXIS 2264, 136 S. Ct. 1083, 84 U.S.L.W. 4159, 205 L.R.R.M. 3594 (U.S. 2016),

 

Over the last six years, Mr. Cafaro has applied his litigation skills toward representing employees aggressively in overtime and discrimination cases. He has represented hundreds of workers successfully in individual wage and hour cases, including class and collective actions. He also litigates discrimination cases in both the federal and state courts.

Fluency in Spanish helps Mr. Cafaro to communicate with clients in their native language.

Spare Yourselves The Agony By Avoiding “Divorce the Hard Way”

Author: Chris Palermo

While no divorce is ever easy, some divorces are the epitome of divorce gone wrong. Rational thinking is absent and emotions become explosive. As the crazy side of yourself and your partner emerges, you find yourselves arguing over the “kitchen sink.” Maintaining a rational perspective can be difficult, and for this reason it is vital to hire a seasoned divorce lawyer. A divorce attorney will protect your interests and advise so you can listen to a voice of reason.

DivorceExamples of Some Outrageous Divorce Entanglements

  • In an effort to avoid talking about clients or recognizable first hand experiences, I found some examples in the Huffington Post where couples lost a viable perspective. The following do a good job of making the point:
  • One couple argued for two hours over who would get the groceries left in the refrigerator. The value of the groceries was around $40 and the cost of the mediation time was about $1,000.
  • During mediation, a couple efficiently arrived at a settlement for dividing personal property, retirement accounts and real property within and hour and a half. They also agreed on a custody arrangement for their six-year old son. However, they then proceeded to spend four hours arguing about how to divide time spent with their dog, which finally resolved through working out a strict calendared schedule for holidays and precise pickup/drop-off times. Read More

Consult with an Attorney about Your Divorce

It is important to consult with a lawyer early on in a divorce case to avoid unnecessary entanglements. Don’t allow your emotions to get the best of you. Attorney Chris Palermo offers compassionate legal help and can help you protect their rights.

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